3D Printed Stamp Creation + Mica Stamping

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SpaceCorgi94

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So after a LONG time not being able to make soap, I've finally settled into my new place and had the chance to break out the soap stuffs once more. I did this by funnily enough, recreating my last "Getting back into it" soap. It was fun to try and recreate something that I made prior. While the size/shapes of the pour were a bit different (as the trace was a bit thinner here) the colours were pretty accurate! The reason they look different here is because of the more amber lighting I have in my kitchen.

In the meantime I'd been developing a few stamps to process the soap, with the hopes of either stamping a logo directly into the bars, OR stamping mica into the bars. I'm still tossing up between the two, but I think for the more colourful soaps I'll leave the stamp clean, and for the more simple colours I might get creative and tap the stamp face into some mica before pressing it into the soap. That being said, I think I am leaning more towards leaving the stamp blank before pressing it in. I don't think I wanna cover up the lovely details of the swirls behind such flat colours.

I've noticed that it's best to wait 3-5 days after cutting to stamp, as this allows the soap to be firm enough to take the pressure of the stamp, and not "pull" out the details as the stamp is removed.

There were some problems with this soap. The drag lines have both been attributed to the improper mica mixing and the cutting (both of which are due to my soap station being as prepared/set up as much as I'd needed it to be) but it's good to be finding this out now so I can better prepare in the future.

Either way, here's the photos!

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And also some shots of the stamps I made / printed out with my 3D Printer. I might do a tutorial on this if I have the time or if people're interested in learning how to make their own. This one had a few imperfections but it was the first time I made a stamp so I'll improve with the next one for sure 😄

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ResolvableOwl

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I'll improve with the next one for sure
Judging from your avatar image, let me guess, you'd mirror it for the next iteration?

A question from a curious 3D-printer amateur: This is one piece, so the elevated regions of the stamp are the first layer that was printed directly onto the glass? How did the 3D printer/slicing software solve the rimming/overhang issues? Wasn't it a lot of work to clean up with a knife/scalpel afterwards?
 

earlene

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I prefer to use small paintbrush to paint the mica onto the soap after stamping. It seems to waste less mica. But you could try it both ways to compare and see what you think.

... with the hopes of either stamping a logo directly into the bars, OR stamping mica into the bars. I'm still tossing up between the two, but I think for the more colourful soaps I'll leave the stamp clean, and for the more simple colours I might get creative and tap the stamp face into some mica before pressing it into the soap...
 

SpaceCorgi94

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Judging from your avatar image, let me guess, you'd mirror it for the next iteration?

A question from a curious 3D-printer amateur: This is one piece, so the elevated regions of the stamp are the first layer that was printed directly onto the glass? How did the 3D printer/slicing software solve the rimming/overhang issues? Wasn't it a lot of work to clean up with a knife/scalpel afterwards?

Well tbh I use a resin 3D Printer so it's a bit easier for me. I print the stamp (debossed logo and the plate it sits on) and the handle seperately. That way the part of the print requiring the highest fidelity to the file is the part least likely to run into issues because the design part of the stamp is actually the last part to be printed :)
 
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