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Old 09-03-2016, 03:05 PM   #1
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I am new to making soy wax candles and I love the outcome! They are creamy and have great hot and cold throw but, I am experiencing some frosting. What causes the frosting and is it something that I can avoid? I do add in vybar and universal additive to my wax. Any input will be great.


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Old 09-03-2016, 04:51 PM   #2
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I'm so glad you posted this! I'm having a terrible time with frosting too so was just sitting down to start researching what my problem might be. I'm using EcoSoya CB & PB, 50% each, scented at 10-12%, poured into clamshells for wax tarts. I heat to about 160F, pour at 140F.

I hope someone comes along with advice, but until then I'm back to google....


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Old 09-03-2016, 04:57 PM   #3
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The frosting has to do with the temperature of the wax -- what it's heated to, and at what temp. it's poured. All of the waxes seem to have varying temps. at which to do this. For the EcoSoya, I think the temp. needs to be raised on the heating, and lowered on the cooling. For specifics, I'll have to come back later!
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Old 09-04-2016, 02:03 AM   #4
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Hmm sounds like I might be pouring too hot. I am used to using paraffin wax and have to pour around 165-170 degrees fahrenheit. Thank you for the info HappyGoNaturally!
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Old 09-04-2016, 02:10 AM   #5
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So far I've read that most people get frosting with the type of wax I'm using. I'm melting and pouring at the recommened temps so I think I'll give another brand a shot. Hopefully you work your frosting issues out too dudeitsashley!
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Old 09-04-2016, 02:21 AM   #6
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I'm using GW444 ... it is heated to 185df and cooled to about 135df -- I haven't had any frosting issues, just a little adhesion problems here and there on larger sized glassware. I believe the GW464 is supposed to be better with glass adhesion, but the scent load is a little less than the GW444 ... both of these waxes are blended with soy additives, so I have not been adding any vybar, etc. (I recently switched from GW415 in which I did use additives, I didn't have any frosting issues, but the tops of my candles were not quite as smooth ... lower fragrance load too.)

The waiting for the cool down takes a little getting used to, esp. compared to paraffin, but I seem to be getting the hang of it -- it just feels kind of odd at first, leaving the wax you've melted to do other things and then coming back to stir again and pour the candle. I keep seeing different opinions on the cure time, but I think overall, at least two days seems to be acceptable. You might need to use a heat gun now and then on the tops, or you might need to top up after it's cooled -- for that, I just melt the little extra I saved and cool it only slightly -- it hasn't frosted on me doing it that way (!), so I guess that's okay to do!
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Old 09-04-2016, 02:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KristaY View Post
So far I've read that most people get frosting with the type of wax I'm using. I'm melting and pouring at the recommened temps so I think I'll give another brand a shot. Hopefully you work your frosting issues out too dudeitsashley!
I read that it may help reduce frosting on the CB135 to pour at a lower temp (100df), but it said to do that if you constantly mix until poured ... that's too much work for me! I haven't read anything or any recommendations about mixing the two waxes (the CB135 and PB), so I don't know if that could be an issue for you. Maybe you could try again without mixing to see what it does, just to know.
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Old 09-04-2016, 02:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dudeitsashley View Post
I am new to making soy wax candles and I love the outcome! They are creamy and have great hot and cold throw but, I am experiencing some frosting. What causes the frosting and is it something that I can avoid? I do add in vybar and universal additive to my wax. Any input will be great.
Don't use Vybar in soy wax. It has been tried by many people over the years and doesn't do anything useful. It's for plain paraffin wax. Also, GW464 already contains the "universal additive" for soy wax.

Soy wax is a flaked shortening. Like any solid fat, it's not really a stable product. It can have a number of different crystal structures and can transform from one to another. The crystal state of the oil affects its appearance and properties.

You can learn to pour a given wax, at least under certain conditions, and not get frosting when the candle is first made. However, you will get it eventually. The wax will change in appearance over time. You can get the white bloom that candlemakers call frosting, the melt point of the wax can change, and the wax can even expand (don't cut the wick short or it could get swallowed).

People who are dedicated to using soy wax often don't color it so that the frosting doesn't stand out.
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Old 09-04-2016, 04:11 AM   #9
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You can learn to pour a given wax, at least under certain conditions, and not get frosting when the candle is first made. However, you will get it eventually. The wax will change in appearance over time. You can get the white bloom that candlemakers call frosting, the melt point of the wax can change, and the wax can even expand (don't cut the wick short or it could get swallowed).

People who are dedicated to using soy wax often don't color it so that the frosting doesn't stand out.
Thanks for this, TOMH! At least I know it's not just me doing something wrong. I made some wax tarts and a few candles several months ago then set them aside. I took them out a few days ago and the frost is significantly more prominent than when I made them. So based on your point that all soy will develop frost, do I change to another wax or just live with the appearance of the frost? Also, is it only an aesthetic problem or does it change the integrity of the candle or tart? (Such as burn pool, soot production, etc?)
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Old 09-04-2016, 08:48 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by KristaY View Post
Thanks for this, TOMH! At least I know it's not just me doing something wrong. I made some wax tarts and a few candles several months ago then set them aside. I took them out a few days ago and the frost is significantly more prominent than when I made them. So based on your point that all soy will develop frost, do I change to another wax or just live with the appearance of the frost? Also, is it only an aesthetic problem or does it change the integrity of the candle or tart? (Such as burn pool, soot production, etc?)
Well, I have never been the biggest fan of soy wax because of these stability issues, and I can assure you there is no ecological or health advantage to using it, but it's popular and can be fun and there's no reason you shouldn't stick with it if you like it and are willing to live with its idiosyncrasies.

The frost is usually thought of as an aesthetic problem. Sometimes candles won't burn the same over time, so it could be considered a little more than that. The different crystal forms of the oil actually have different melting points, so you could notice a change in the melt pool. These crystal "polymorphs" also take different amounts of space, which is how wicks can sometimes get swallowed into the wax over time.

Mainly what you can do is practice pouring your wax so it comes out nice, then store the candles at a mild and steady temperature, and don't make so many that they sit around forever.

Different soy waxes have different personalities, so you could certainly try out different ones and see what you like best. At least one pretty-looking and significantly frost-resistant soy wax has been developed, but it's not popular with small candlemakers because it doesn't throw scent worth a damn. Over ten years I have tried a lot of waxes plus every crafty or science-y technique under the sun. There's no magic product or formula.

Interestingly, I found that the nicest one to work with by my reckoning was plain old GW415. Nothing exotic, no additives. It burns well and throws scent pretty well (for soy wax) and the candles can come out quite nice. That's a simple, no-fuss way to go.


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