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Soap Making Forum > Recipe & Tutorials Forum > Soap Making Recipes & Tutorials > Would like a recipe for a simple Castile-like soap that cures fast
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Old 06-23-2016, 09:42 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by shunt2011 View Post
The only other alternative is to use a high percentage of butters (Shea/Cocoa) however you will also sacrifice in the lather with them. I agree with formulating your own recipes using a soap calculator. Especially since you are opposed to Palm, Lard and want something that doesn't require a long cure. You could also do 100% CO with a high SF.
I was thinking the same as shunt with the 100% coconut oil with a higher sf. Maybe go for 15% -20% sf. That makes a nice simple bar.


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Old 06-23-2016, 10:23 PM   #12
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You could also try a salt bar. That's typically 100% coconut oil with 20% superfat. It will firm up fast so you can cut sooner than a bastile recipe. But most folks like them best with a 2-3month cure so that may not be soon enough for your liking. If you're determined to make an all-veggie soap that doesn't use palm oil and can be used quickly, I would look at liquid soap instead of bar soap.


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Old 06-24-2016, 01:24 AM   #13
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I am curious; why are you so anxious to have a short curing time? Making soap is not for those in a rush to get to the finished product. You can certainly use a 100% olive oil soap as soon as it is finished curing for only 4 to 6 weeks, especially if you use a high lye concentration (like the 45% suggested). That's less water to have to evaporate out. It will be soap. It will get you clean. However, it will be soft soap that will be very mushy when it gets wet, so, it will not last very long. You'll end up going through an entire batch of soap in a very short period of time. But, it may not matter to you if you have short-lived soap. What may matter to you is that you are actually using soap that YOU made with your own two hands. (A totally awesome feeling.) Personally, I love my soaps, but I also want them to last as long as possible, too. So I give them a long cure. My 100% olive oil soaps were made 08/04/2015, and I've only used one bar to test the qualities of the soap over the year. It is a very nice bar of soap. The lather has improved over time and I've noticed when I leave it on the counter for a little while (specifically for this "test") it doesn't get a slimy white soft coating as bad anymore. The bar used to melt/suck up a lot of water when I'd leave it in a puddle for a few minutes. It took a long time for it to completely dry out. Now it only gets a soft crustiness to it and dries by the end of the day. I refer to it as my slime (or melt) test, to see how long a bar will last when it is not properly cared for when used. I don't do it all of my soaps, just the ones with a larger portion of liquid oils.

ETA: I'm not judging. I'm just curious. If you feel this question is being rude or intrusive, I'm sorry. Obviously, you don't have to answer it.
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Old 06-24-2016, 01:22 PM   #14
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Thanks for the responses all of you. It will take me some time to digest them, but I will read through and make notes.

TeresaT, Iíve got nothing against long curing times in general. Iím willing to wait a couple of years for my Castile soaps to cure, after all. But because Iíve just started out Iím a bit impatient to test my own creations. And I really want a simple Castile. But the good news is that Iíve ordered a couple from UK, and I recieved them today.

Iím known for being a bit impatient, and hopefully soap making can teach me something about that.

Not sure if any of you have any experience with programming, but thatís my background. What every beginner usually wants is to as quick as possible have their very own program running. It usually is very simple and prints ďHello, world.Ē on the screen. Apparently, soap making is very different from programming.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:08 PM   #15
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Not sure if any of you have any experience with programming, but thatís my background. What every beginner usually wants is to as quick as possible have their very own program running. It usually is very simple and prints ďHello, world.Ē on the screen. Apparently, soap making is very different from programming.
I have been a mainframe programmer for 15 years now.

Making soap has a lot in common with programming. There is a basic procedure that you always follow, but then you can add on bells and whistles til your heart is content. You are really only limited by your knowledge which can be learned, and your imagination.

I like both the art and science behind making soap. I can not draw a stick figure - but I can create some pretty nice looking swirls.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:28 PM   #16
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I have been a mainframe programmer for 15 years now.

Making soap has a lot in common with programming. There is a basic procedure that you always follow, but then you can add on bells and whistles til your heart is content. You are really only limited by your knowledge which can be learned, and your imagination.

I like both the art and science behind making soap. I can not draw a stick figure - but I can create some pretty nice looking swirls.
Cool! What kind of language do you use?

Iím mostly into web development these days, although Iím considering transitioning to doing more design work/visual problem solving as it seems like my natural abilities are stronger in that area. Complex systems in the real world tend to melt my brain. I prefer when I can choose a small subset of a craft, lock every variable and dig deep into what Iíve chosen to focus on. This guess this translates to soap making in that I try to choose one method (CP), a few types (Castile and Bastile), a consistent way of doing it (following a strict process) and iteratively improve the way things are done.

Not sure if this leads to good soap, but itís the way my brain (currently) is wired.
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Old 06-24-2016, 02:56 PM   #17
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Cool! What kind of language do you use?

Iím mostly into web development these days, although Iím considering transitioning to doing more design work/visual problem solving as it seems like my natural abilities are stronger in that area. Complex systems in the real world tend to melt my brain. I prefer when I can choose a small subset of a craft, lock every variable and dig deep into what Iíve chosen to focus on. This guess this translates to soap making in that I try to choose one method (CP), a few types (Castile and Bastile), a consistent way of doing it (following a strict process) and iteratively improve the way things are done.

Not sure if this leads to good soap, but itís the way my brain (currently) is wired.
COBOL, JCL, SQL, and a little linux shell scripting. I have dabbled in teaching myself ruby and java - but it isn't catching on without real world application.

I have done some html and css. I keep playing with the idea of setting up my own e-store.

You might find you really like those kinds of soap. There is not one master recipe that will make everyone happy, no right or wrong. So try it all in 1 pound batches and see what is best for you.
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Old 06-24-2016, 11:34 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kchaystack View Post
I have been a mainframe programmer for 15 years now.

Making soap has a lot in common with programming. There is a basic procedure that you always follow, but then you can add on bells and whistles til your heart is content. You are really only limited by your knowledge which can be learned, and your imagination.

I like both the art and science behind making soap. I can not draw a stick figure - but I can create some pretty nice looking swirls.
I'm a mainframe programmer too with pretty much the same skill set (COBOL, DB2, SQL). I agree the analytical skills needed for programming can also be applied to soap making (and baking which is my other favorite hobby). Guess that's why I love watching Alton Brown on the Food channel . . . it's like science class applied to food
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Old 06-24-2016, 11:59 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by alexanderte View Post
Cool! What kind of language do you use?

Iím mostly into web development these days, although Iím considering transitioning to doing more design work/visual problem solving as it seems like my natural abilities are stronger in that area. Complex systems in the real world tend to melt my brain. I prefer when I can choose a small subset of a craft, lock every variable and dig deep into what Iíve chosen to focus on. This guess this translates to soap making in that I try to choose one method (CP), a few types (Castile and Bastile), a consistent way of doing it (following a strict process) and iteratively improve the way things are done.

Not sure if this leads to good soap, but itís the way my brain (currently) is wired
.
Ha! That explains it! That sounds like me and my hyper-focus type of ADHD. I am flighty, flaky and forgetful. However, when something grabs my attention, it grabs my attention and I am consumed/lost in it for hours at a time. I like archiving and filing and all of those tedious things. Analyzing a process and making improvements to it so that it's more efficient. "Finding a needle in a haystack." All of these are my ideas of fun.

We all have to do what's right for us as individuals. Now I understand you a little better and can see why you are wanting a quick soap.
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:37 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by doriettefarm View Post
I'm a mainframe programmer too with pretty much the same skill set (COBOL, DB2, SQL). I agree the analytical skills needed for programming can also be applied to soap making (and baking which is my other favorite hobby). Guess that's why I love watching Alton Brown on the Food channel . . . it's like science class applied to food
Don't get me started on baking and desserts. I'm hit-or-miss with it imo. I've been pining for German chocolate cake for years but my kid's allergic to tree nuts. You can't substitute nothing in that cake- it's coconutty-nutty perfection.


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